The Human Rights Industrial Complex with Dan Kovalik

  
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Dan Kovalik, author of No More War joins us to talk about the Human Rights Industrial Complex

Show Notes:

00:30 - Uribe and the violence against union members

3:55 - What are Humanitarian interventions?

In Venezuela the largely created the humanitarian intervention used to justify the overthrow the government.

Dan Kovalik

5:00 - IMF denied loans to Venezuela

6:25 - US Sanctions and their effects.

CEPR Paper on Venezuelan Sanctions

9:34 - Amnesty International and how they opposed Mandela

10:00 - Structural problems with Human Rights Groups

12:54 - Human Rights Watch

14:00 - Ken Roth’s Tweet on Hezbollah

16:00 - Human Rights industry was “neutral” on Iraq.

17:49 - Human Rights Watch use Christian Extremist Adrian Zenz in their Report

22:00 - Human Rights Groups that peddled Iraq lies

23:00 - Revolving Door for Human Rights Group

24:00 - Human Rights by Non-State Actors

25:00 - Mining Companies in Congo

26:00 - Elon Musk’s confession

30:00 - International Law and How it is applied

32:00 - US Sanctions against the ICC

34:00 - The Right to Peace

36:00 - How to Smell Regime Change Propaganda from a Mile Away

38:00 - Selectivity about Genocide vs Word Genocide as a weapon

43:00 - Corporate Crimes Against Humanity

45:00 - Right to Organize as a Union as a Human Right

49:00 - How to organize in the US and Abroad


Daniel Kovalik graduated from Columbia University School of Law in 1993.  He then served as in-house counsel for the United Steelworkers, AFL-CIO (USW) until 2019. While with the USW, he worked on Alien Tort Claims Act cases against The Coca-Cola Company, Drummond and Occidental Petroleum – cases arising out of egregious human rights abuses in Colombia. The Christian Science Monitor, referring to his work defending Colombian unionists under threat of assassination, described Mr. Kovalik as “one of the most prominent defenders of Colombian workers in the United States.” Mr. Kovalik received the David W. Mills Mentoring Fellowship from Stanford University School of Law and was the recipient of the Project Censored Award for his article exposing the unprecedented killing of trade unionists in Colombia. He has written extensively on the issue of international human rights and U.S. foreign policy for the Huffington Post and Counterpunch and has lectured throughout the world on these subjects.